blank'/> 66 Square Feet (Plus): New York Spring (just): Dean and Union Streets

Monday, May 26, 2008

New York Spring (just): Dean and Union Streets

The Gowanus Lounge has been kind enough to post a few of my pictures. Here's one I took yesterday on Dean Street on my way to hell, I mean Circuit City.

Also on Dean I found a clematis growing along the bottom of a black railing.


And a honey locust [Ed. oops, it's a black locust: you can eat the pods of a honey locust. You must not eat the pods of a black locust. You will get seeck. Black locusts have rot-resistant wood, though, so we ought to be building deck out of them, not rain forest wood. Anyway, I hate the bark of both, honey and black. Click here for quite a funny discussion about how to tell the wood apart, or not] whose only redeeming feature is this two-three week period in May. It smells lemony, sweet, lovely.

And today, on a Memorial Day meander, walking off the icky feeling I'd collected in the Cobble Hill Park watching many moms and dads with their crawling offspring and entitled, complacent miens (my lovely friend Constanza, and her Lucas - who sat pondering upon [literally] things) are, of course, different, thus exempt), I met...the boyfriend of the gardener who made the sweet garden at the Gowanus Canal. He was watering it, she was awol for a few minutes. I told him how it was my favourite garden in New York, period, and he said she's shy about it. I hope to see more of them. The humans, I mean. I was too self conscious to start snapping away, but I will, I will. I confessed that photographs of the garden had traveled to South Africa and been part of a New York garden talk. I also visited the cherry in a square planter on the far side of the canal, nearer the Rottweiler lot, and the cherry was loaded with green fruit. They will be ripe late next month, I think.

Armed with a baguette and a saucisson from Stinky I walked down the block of Union Street between Smith and Hoyt, where the remnants of old gardens tell of days when people loved their small pieces of land. There is a particular rose, with black in its red petals, that repeats itself five or six times down the block. Also the tiny little dog rose that is so Hamptons-ish. Two men were digging out a massive bed of daylilies, in front of one of the rambling red roses and I was rather sad. The orange lilies look amazing in front of that deep crimson backdrop. I was tempted to tell them that they could, yes! eat daylilies in salads, or steamed (the buds) and like potatoes (the tubers), but after two seconds' consideration and a look at their faces thought...ah...nope.





2 comments:

  1. Gosh my ears are still ringing! Why couldn't they settle for black-honey-locust? ;-) I wanted to submit my own reply but I'm not sure they would have laughed...

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yeah, I told you all carpenters are a little touched. They're...special.

    ReplyDelete


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